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just a question

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just a question

Postby rafter » Sun Jul 09, 2017 1:06 pm

I hope some of you who never post will give an opinion. Canadian or not.

Is it a good thing for Canada to allow Mexicans to enter so easily. I think they only need to buy a $7 permit.

Stay tuned to find out if you were right or not. Feel free to expand.
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Re: just a question

Postby Intruder » Sun Jul 09, 2017 9:48 pm

Hey Donald
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Re: just a question

Postby rafter » Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:53 am

No need to be mean.
Look, it is just a question. I think it is an interesting situation. The cost of a plane ticket is probably a lot less than the cost of a coyote. Canada runs the risk of having undesirables enter the country. On the other hand maybe a lot of workers will enter. On the other hand maybe there aren't jobs in Canada and it is my understanding that Canada does not offer any kind of health benefits. So is this just some kind of bs political ploy by the Prime Minister and nobody will really go or .......what? Was really just wondering what people thought. Is it a good thing with potential or is it a bad idea?
Maybe I just don't understand and it is much more difficult to enter than has been written.
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Re: just a question

Postby van2pv » Mon Jul 10, 2017 1:59 pm

There is a lot more to it than just the small application fee that you have indicated.

Yes, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lifted the visa requirement for Mexicans and they are now trying to take advantage of Canada’s asylum program. During the first two months of 2017 Canada has received 156 asylum claims from Mexican nationals, compared to the 15 claims made in the first two months of 2016. The numbers are not huge for asylum seekers.

The person seeking asylum must demonstrate to a Canadian judge that they meet the legal definition of a refugee – that they face a well-founded fear of persecution and that their home country has failed to provide safety and protection. But Mexican asylum seekers typically fail to meet Canada’s standard of a refugee as only about 10% of applicants are accepted and given refugee status in Canada. The low acceptance rate for Mexican asylum seekers is due to the fact that, while Mexico can be a dangerous place, simply coming from there is not enough to qualify for asylum in Canada. A person must face direct persecution, and most Mexicans are not persecuted according to legal definitions.

As with all visa lifts that Canada undertakes, they carefully monitor migration trends to ensure the integrity of Canada's immigration system is upheld. The Canadian Border Services Agency can detain foreign nationals if it is believed they pose a danger to the public, if their identity is unclear or if they are deemed unlikely to appear for removal or for a proceeding.

In the first two months of 2017, more than 440 Mexicans were detained while entering Canada, a sharp increase from the total number of those detained throughout 2016, which was just 410 for the entire year. More than 300 others were turned away at Canadian airports.

Those authorized to travel to Canada are expected to leave the country after a maximum stay of six months. But, red flags may come up during the interview process (that may be indicative of whether or not they plan to remain in the country past authorization), and they are treated accordingly.
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Re: just a question

Postby Gringotim » Mon Jul 10, 2017 2:40 pm

A lot of fruit is grown in Canada, or at least in BC, and since most Canadians, even thoughs who are unemployed, won't pick fruit to earn money, so some one has to do it, and most Mexicans have a great work ethic, so if thats why they are coming here, I don't see a problem. As a side note, there were even some "Mexican" workers employed during the construction of the last Trump hotel in Vancouver., but don't tell "The Donald"
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Re: just a question

Postby rafter » Mon Jul 10, 2017 2:59 pm

So, Van, I would have thought that lifting the visa requirement and the asylum program would be two different things. You have seemed to lump them together. I don't understand that. I have read that if someone comes in through the asylum route; they would have medical benefits (even if it was going through the courts) whereas just coming in...no.
Gringotim, fruit is a seasonal thing. Do Mexicans already come in to pick fruit when they can and thus dropping the visa requirement would make it easier to do so??
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Re: just a question

Postby van2pv » Mon Jul 10, 2017 4:04 pm

rafter wrote:So, Van, I would have thought that lifting the visa requirement and the asylum program would be two different things. You have seemed to lump them together. I don't understand that. I have read that if someone comes in through the asylum route; they would have medical benefits (even if it was going through the courts) whereas just coming in...no.

They are two different things.
Your question was whether it was a good thing. Of course it is. Canada's borders are not locked down like they might be in other countries. Legitimate people are given opportunities to visit Canada. If the newcomer will behave and follow the rules, they get into Canada if they meet the requirements that are applied to all potential border crossing individuals. I have already alluded to that in my previous comments.
Canadians are hoping that people who don't follow the rules will be screened out and turned around whence they came. Canada's border staff are detaining visitors whom authorities consider to pose a threat or lack proper identification, and those who seem unlikely to reemerge voluntarily for a future immigration hearing. Sometimes a few squeeze through, as is the case when new-comers arrive anywhere in the world.
I was a little more articulate on the asylum issue as that is where rules are strict. And yes, there are medical benefits to those who meet the asylum requirements. Humane countries with a social safety net do that. Regular visa entries do not include medical - you must be Canadian citizen for that or pay as you go just like Canadian visitors do in Mexico.
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